Which types of rock are used in radiometric dating

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In the case of carbon dating, it is not the initial quantity that is important, but the initial ratio of C, but the same principle otherwise applies.Recognizing this problem, scientists try to focus on rocks that do not contain the decay product originally.There are a number of implausible assumptions involved in radiometric dating with respect to long time periods.One key assumption is that the initial quantity of the parent element can be determined.The second way that a nucleus could be disrupted is by particles striking it.However, the nucleus has a strong positive charge and the electron shells have a strong negative charge. Those that can decay are mesons and baryons, which include protons and neutrons; although decays can involve other particles such as photons, electrons, positrons, and neutrinos.In fact, it is possible to shut down electron capture completely—simply ionize the substance so that there are no electrons nearby.There is a fairly well-known example of chemical state affecting electron capture activity.

This can happen due to one of three forces or "interactions": strong, electromagnetic, and weak, in order of decreasing strength. Radiometric dating is a method of determining the age of an artifact by assuming that on average decay rates have been constant (see below for the flaws in that assumption) and measuring the amount of radioactive decay that has occurred.Radiometric dating is mostly used to determine the age of rocks, though a particular form of radiometric dating—called Radiocarbon dating—can date wood, cloth, skeletons, and other organic material.For these reasons, if a rock strata contains zircon, running a uranium-lead test on a zircon sample will produce a radiometric dating result that is less dependent on the initial quantity problem.Another assumption is that the rate of decay is constant over long periods of time.

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